How We Can Help You

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How We Can Help You 2017-05-01T20:24:20+00:00

MHP Salud Products & Support

Building on our over 30 years of experience in designing, implementing and improving Community Health Worker programs, we’ve taken our innovative, outcomes-driven Community Health Worker programming to offer you the tools to make it work in your system, with your providers, and for your population.

Training Services

Virtual and in-person training for Community Health Workers, Program Supervisors, Administrators and Grant Writers – all customized from a range of topics to meet your needs.

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Consulting Services

Expert support on technology, program evaluation, strategic planning, program optimization, grant funding and more so that you can put our experience to work for you.

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Design & Implementation Services

Personalized design and implementation support to build the Community Health Worker program you want within your budget and parameters.

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Why Community Health Worker Programs Matter

We have found that the purposeful integration of Community Health Workers at both the grassroots and health systems levels leads to more complete care and better health outcomes. With a growing focus in the healthcare field on community-based solutions, improved quality of care, and an emphasis on preventive care and population health, as well as a shift toward value-based payment systems, we believe that Community Health Workers will be a key part of the new direction of healthcare.

Community Health Workers At Your Organization

Community Health Worker programs have been successfully implemented in most healthcare settings. To help you envision how a Community Health Worker program could benefit your organization, for each setting, we have compiled examples of effective programs, ideas for program focus and a summary of products to support your organization.

Community Health Workers and Health Plans

  • Address social determinants of health by referring patients to complimentary and supportive services such as housing, food, transportation, or legal assistance.
  • Provide support and personalized attention to reduce hospital readmission in high-risk populations and improve post-hospital outcomes.
  • Improve health outcomes by helping to ensure that patients understand and follow treatment plans and take prescribed medications correctly.
  • Supporting disease self-management strategies and assisting with individual goal setting and tracking progress.

Why Community Health Workers?

As part of a multi-disciplinary team, Community Health Worker programs “can contribute to reductions in costs to health systems through reducing patient use of costlier care options, such as emergency departments and hospitals.”*

Community Health Workers are uniquely qualified to provide high-touch support to the communities they serve. At Molina Healthcare Community Connector Program used Community Health Workers to target members with “high-cost utilization patterns, complex medical or behavioral health needs, or chronic conditions” and provided in-person engagement and personalized strategies to achieve targeted outcomes. A six-month pilot of this program “resulted in a return on investment of 4:1 when comparing the six-month study-period data with data for the six months preceding and following the intervention.”*
Similarly, a Health Navigator Program at Inland Empire Health Plan used a Community Health Worker home-visitation model to help “connect members with primary care physicians and reduce avoidable emergency department utilization“. Over the course of three years, the program contributed to a 42% decrease in avoidable emergency department visits.*

Studies have found Community Health Worker programs to be effective in promoting cost-effective care “through increasing patients’ use of preventive services, foregoing the use of more resource-intensive services, and helping individuals adopt positive health behaviors in the management of chronic conditions”.*

*Taking Innovation to Scale: Community Health Workers, Promotores, and the Triple Aim, California Health Workforce Alliance.

Community Health Workers at Hospitals

  • Improve care coordination by helping to ensure appointment and medication adherence and by supporting with case management activities and service coordination with other health and social service providers.
  • Assist with a range of clinical performance improvement initiatives and support in the development of a holistic medical home by acting as a bridge between the hospital and the community.
  • Improve the quality of care through culturally and linguistically appropriate services and support that addresses a patient’s health literacy and language needs.
  • Promoting continuity in health services by ensuring that patients are able to receive the care they need through assistance with enrollment, appointment setting, referrals, and transportation to and from appointments.*

Why Community Health Workers?

Studies have found that Community Health Workers in hospital settings can help to address behavioral, socioeconomic, and environmental factors in post-hospital outcomes, and support in reducing hospital readmission in high-risk populations.**
Additionally, upstream Community Health Worker strategies receiving hospital community benefit support will help build individual and community capacity for better health, leading to stronger, healthier communities.***

*Community Health Workers “101” for Primary Care Providers and Other Stakeholders in Health Care Systems, Journal of Ambulatory Care Management. Volume 34.
**Patient-Centered Community Health Worker Intervention to Improve Posthospital Outcomes, JAMA Internal Medicine, April 2014.
***Minnesota Department of Human Services.

Community Health Workers at Health Departments

  • Address social determinants of health by referring patients to complimentary and supportive services such as housing, food, transportation, or legal assistance.
  • Provide culturally and linguistically appropriate services to a community.
  • Connect with underserved or at risk populations and improve access to services within a community.
  • Reduce barriers to care by providing outreach services to increase community awareness of health department services and available support.

Why Community Health Workers?

Community Health Workers are culturally competent mediators or health brokers between health service provides and members of diverse communities and are effective in promoting the use of primary and follow-up care to prevent and manage disease. Community Health Worker programs have been shown to be effective in addressing a range of “health care concerns, including asthma, hypertension, diabetes, cancer, immunizations, maternal and child health, nutrition, tuberculosis, and HIV and AIDS“.*

There has been noted success in programs using Community Health Workers in social service delivery, coordinating access to social services and providing recommendations to available resources. Community Health Workers often share the same racial and ethnic background, socioeconomic status, and language as the people they serve and have a deep understanding of the cultural and social contexts where people live, providing them with a strong foundation for building a trusting relationship with the individuals and families they support.**

Large scale health initiatives have used Community Health Worker programs to recruit program participants, provide health education, and service as a bridge between clinical providers and program participants. Through the Racial and Ethnic Approaches to Community Health Program (REACH), Community Health Workers are used as a “grassroots empowerment strategies to reduce health inequities among various populations and to improve health outcomes.” Community Health Worker services include education and disease case management (for heart disease and stroke, diabetes, prenatal care, immunizations, breast and cervical cancer, and asthma) as well as promoting change in the social environment, systems and policy (school wellness programs, access to healthy foods, and more).*

*Addressing Chronic Disease through Community Health Workers, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.
**Making the Connection: The Role of Community Health Workers in Health Homes, NYS Health Foundation.

Community Health Workers at Nonprofits

  • Provide culturally and linguistically appropriate services to a community.
  • Facilitate community development through empowerment initiatives. Community Health Workers are members of a community who are trained to support their peers on a range issues.
  • Allow an organization to reach underserved or at risk populations and improve access to services within a community.
  • Facilitate sustainable change by finding solutions for the community, from the community.

Why Community Health Workers?

Community Health Worker programs have been found to help their community overcome “geographic, cultural, linguistic and other barriers that underserved populations often face in access to and receipt of quality care” and “promote reductions in health disparities“. They can also “promote advocacy by building individual and community capacity for change” by collecting data related to community health needs, advocating for the enforcement or development of public or institutional policies that address individual or community needs, and “engaging community members to build knowledge and skills for self-directed change and community development“.*

Programs with Community Health Workers have effectively been used to provide “culturally appropriate and accessible health education and information” as well as informal counseling and social support “by listening to the concerns of patients and their family members and helping them solve problems”.**

*Taking Innovation to Scale: Community Health Workers, Promotores, and the Triple Aim, California Health Workforce Alliance.
**Addressing Chronic Disease through Community Health Workers, National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion.

Community Health Workers and Primary Care Providers

  • Improve health outcomes by helping to ensure medication adherence and working with patients to help them understand and follow treatment plans.
  • Support care coordination activities such as follow-up phone calls and home visits to help make sure that patients attend their appointments.
  • Promote continuity of care by providing assistance with enrollment, appointment adherence, transportation, and providing follow-up care.*
  • Supporting disease self-management strategies by assessing how well a plan is working for a patient and helping them to meet their goals and working with clinician to support individual goal setting.*
  • Provide patient education to ensure patients are able to obtain and use home health devices.*
  • Providing multidisciplinary care to prevent and control chronic disease and act as a bridge between the primary care provider and the community.
  • Improve quality of care through culturally and linguistically appropriate services and support that addresses a patient’s health literacy and language needs.

Why Community Health Workers?

Community Health Workers are uniquely suited to support the patient-centered medical home model as they have close ties to the community, are able to engage patients in disease self-management, are culturally competent, and support in the continuity of communication between the patient and the provider.*

Community Health Workers have been shown to be effective in promoting follow-up care and the use of primary care to prevent and manage diseases and health conditions such as diabetes, asthma, hypertension, HIV and AIDS, tuberculosis, cancer and more.*

As part of a health care delivery team, Community Health Workers help free up valuable clinician time, and when paired with a nurse, have been shown to be especially effective in improving patient outcomes, particularly for diabetes and hypertension control.*

*Community Health Workers “1o1” for Primary Care Providers and Other Stakeholders in Health Care Systems, Journal of Ambulatory Care Management, Volume 34.

Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) include all organizations receiving grants under Section 330 of the Public Health Service Act (PHS).

  • FQHCs must serve an underserved area or population, offer a sliding fee scale, provide comprehensive services, have an ongoing quality assurance program, and have a governing board of directors.
  • FQHCs also qualify for enhanced reimbursement from Medicare and Medicaid, in addition to other benefits.

If you believe that your health center is Federally Qualified or aren’t sure about your current classification, please review the information below for additional information about how we can help you to develop and improve Community Health Worker programs or contact us to learn more.

For Health Centers who are not Federally Qualified, please review our Primary Care Provider page for additional information about available products and support.

How We Can Help Federally Qualified Health Centers

With support from the the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), MHP Salud is able to offer training and technical assistance to Federally Qualified Health Centers.

For more information about the services that we are able to offer, please contact our CBA Team.

Community Health Workers at Federally Qualified Health Centers

Community Health Workers can work to address a variety of health issues and they take many different approaches to promoting health. Community Health Workers and Community Health Worker programs can support Federally Qualified Health Centers in accomplishing the following goals:

  • Reduce barriers to care by providing outreach services to increase community awareness of health center services and available support.
  • Address social determinants of health by referring patients to complimentary and supportive services such as housing, food, transportation, or legal assistance.
  • Improve care coordination by helping to ensure appointment and medication adherence through phone calls and other reminders and by supporting with case management activities and service coordination with other health and social services providers.
  • Improve the quality of care through culturally and linguistically appropriate services and support that addresses a patient’s health literacy and language needs.
  • Support in the development of a holistic medical home by acting as a bridge from the health center to the community and assist with a range of clinical performance improvement initiatives.

Why Community Health Workers?

Community Health Worker programs have been implemented successfully in many Federally Qualified Health Centers and used to address a range of health concerns. These programs can be used to address the larger social determinants of health and remove common barriers to care faced by communities, and may include complimentary support such as “enrollment assistance, transportation and home visitation, as well as employment counseling, housing assistance, food banks, and meals”. However, the most frequent services provided Community Health Workers at health centers are often health education, outreach, nutrition guidance, and social services.*

When Community Health Workers are integrated into a multidisciplinary team, they can help to improve the capacity of health centers to meet the needs of the community by removing barriers to accessing and receiving quality care, and supporting providers in engaging patients in their health care.* They can support wirh “educating patients and their families on the importance of lifestyle changes and on adherence to their medication regimens and recommended treatments, and finding ways to increase compliance with medications”, as well as, “creating community-clinical linkages to help create a team based approach through supporting and enhancing the work of the healthcare team”.**

Additional Resources

MHP Salud has developed a range of manuals, documents and reports to support Community Health Worker program design, implementation and improvement. Take a look at our Resource Portfolio to browse our collection of materials.

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